Thursday, January 17, 2013

Mod Podge Faux Stained Glass Snowflakes





These faux stained glass snowflakes were fun to make. I couldn't stop thinking of variations and might have made more if I hadn't run out of Mod Podge.



Here's what you need to make them:

  • Paper
  • Pencil/Pen
  • Piece of clear plastic (like the kind they use to make windows in packaging so the product is visible)
  • Craft Cord or Embroidery Thread
  • Mod Podge (I used regular gloss formula but any of them would probably be fine)
  • Brush
  • Glitter or Paint (optional)
  • Toothpick
  • Scissors



Start by drawing a continuos loopy pattern that looks like a snowflake. Then place the pattern under a piece of clear plastic. I used something that came from a box of holiday cards, but any sturdy clear plastic like stenciling blanks, acetate, heavy duty gallon storage bags, will probably work. Just be sure the plastic bends a little because it will help in getting the flake off when it's done. (I also tried one using parchment paper. It worked, but the parchment left a frosty residue on the Mod Podge. It also wrinkled once the  podge was applied and left the finish a bit uneven.)



Cut a length of craft cord that's long enough to follow the pattern. (Craft cord is very similar to embroidery thread, it's just cheaper and the strands don't pull apart into smaller threads the way embroidery thread does. You could also use embroidery thread.) Soak the cord in water for a few seconds then dip it into Mod Podge.

Run the cord through your fingers to remove any excess podge and begin following the pattern with the cord.



A toothpick can help position the loops. I also learned that the toothpick was a huge help whenever the cord crossed itself. I'd press the toothpick to down onto the top thread help to hold everything in place while I started forming the next loop. (This part takes a bit of practice. My third snowflake was fast and easy compared to my first, which seemed awkward and difficult.)

Tip: If you find that the string is starting to get too stiff to bend, dip your fingers into water and Mod Podge and run them down the section of string you're working on. As you get more practiced you'll get faster and will be able to form a snowflake before the string starts to dry.

Once the pattern is complete cut off any extra cord and set the whole thing aside to dry for a few hours, or even overnight. Once it's dry it can be filled with the first coat of Mod Podge.



Use a brush to applied a thick coat in each empty space. Fill them enough so the podge touches the string but isn't overflowing. Set aside and let dry overnight. Once it's dry add a second coat, and if you'd like sprinkle on some glitter. Let it dry for at least a few hours (up to overnight depending on how thick the coat is and the amount of glitter). Then once it's is dry (it'll look clear) apply one more thick coat. Making sure to fill in any spaces on the edges that might have been missed with the first coats.

That's the basic technique, but as I made more flakes I began to experiment...

I made a flake by adding small cut pieces of string onto my main continuous thread shape.



Instead of putting glitter on with the second coat and covering it with the third, I put glue only on the last coat. The glitter stands out more this way (which is especially nice if you're using pale or white colored glitter).



For the second of third coats of this flake I mixed paint with the Podge to get an opaque look. Using food coloring mixed with Mod Podge- a technique I picked up from my friend Pam and Gingerbread Snowflakes- would create a fabulous stained glass look too!



I also want to mention another brilliant Mod Podge project from Pam. She made the most realistic, lovely colored, fall leaves using Mod Podge. Although I read Pam's blog regularly I somehow missed them the first time around and just discovered them recently. They are amazing- a must see! And it was part of my conversation with Pam regarding her technique that inspired me to use Mod Podge mixed with paint on this snowflake.



Using different types of embellishments was fun too. This flake combined a large cut, chunky "snow" glitter, and tiny glass beads. I bet one filled with a variety of glass beads would be gorgeous!



Once the snowflakes have dried they can be peeled off the plastic and hung up to catch the sun. To hang mine I poked an ornament hanger through the top but you could also use thread or fishing line.









5 comments:

  1. These remind me of the plastic film I played with as a kid to make flower petals on a wire! Cool technique!

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  2. Very, very cool snowflakes indeed! Mod Podge is amazing stuff isn't it? And using it as a film as you have done here gives us a whole new world of possibilities to explore!

    I love that you are having fun with this!

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  3. Love it Meg! It brings me back to the days of my youth! I think we will attempt these today since we have a snow day!

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  4. What a totally fun technique! I will be featuring this on Craft Gossip this morning. http://homeandgarden.craftgossip.com/

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  5. I like this, a lot! Thank you for sharing your idea, and those links *follows link trail*

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